Making dark earth

Making dark earth is not just a tribute to the ancient peoples of the Amazon. This type of soil is the result of a balanced and sustainable evolution and is, in the current planetary situation, a solution among the most efficient to reverse the climate change picture through carbon sequestration. It is still astonishingly brilliant in empowering the local community, in developing independent family farming, and in rescuing healthy food as the premise of social welfare.

 

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Rascal monkey

The capuchin monkey (Cebus apella) is not romantically contemplating the flower of passion fruit (Passiflora coccinea), as it might seem; He is implying with the photographer, who, at first, was framing his own flower. The monkey came suddenly, picked up the flower and ate it as a trickster. If he knew that the photographer was very pleased with this event, he probably would not have done it, for it is in the nature of this monkey to implicate humans. P20_462 | Nikon F5 | Fujichrome Provia 100 Nikkor 70-200mm 2.8 | 1991 | Leonide Principe, CCPA Collection

From Leonide Principe Archive

New Dark Earth

Active coal or biochar produced for the purpose of generating dark earth. This type of coal, easy to produce, has depurative and detoxifying properties when ingested. Added to the agricultural compost, it serves as a fixative of beneficial nutrients, bacteria and fungi.
Moreover, applied on a large scale in agriculture, it can contribute consistently to reverse climate change by capturing carbon in the soil.
Added to soil contaminated by pesticides absorbs chemical residues and heavy metals.
Several other properties are being studied for application in several sectors.

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Amazoniapedia is on-line!

In a letter dated May 30, 1931, the donor, Dr. Rocha Thury, tells how he found this piece: “(…) which I found on the fringes of a tributary stream of Anamã Lake, having led it with the purpose of offering to the Institute …” “(…) I regret that only this small part is found in the small vessel, for the rest was broken by ignorant passers-by, leading the pieces of which they thought to be used as a whetstone.” “(…) the figure, unfortunately, finds himself without a head, which was taken by a fisherman, who, using the harpoon he carried, took it as a mere joke, telling me that this head had rays like those of the sun.” Piece of the IGHA archaeological collection (Geographical-Historical Institute of Amazonas).

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Two kissing macaws

Scarlet macaws (Ara macao). Eternally faithful, wacaws have only one companion for their lifetime. P01_001 | Nikon F5 | Fujichrome Velvia 50 – Nikkor 80-200mm 2.8 | 1991 | Leonide Principe, CCPA Collection

From Leonide Principe Archive

Scarlet macaws (Ara macao). Eternally faithful, wacaws have only one companion for their lifetime.
P01_001 | Nikon F5 | Fujichrome Velvia 50 – Nikkor 80-200mm 2.8 | 1991 | Leonide Principe, CCPA Collection